Hungary by Atlatszo – Paks II. NPP site should be moved because it sits right at tectonic fault line

Plans for the Paks II plant - photo by MVM Paks II. Zrt.
Plans for the Paks II plant - photo by MVM Paks II. Zrt.

This is what Atlatszo.hu wrote this week:

Paks II. NPP site should be moved because it sits right at tectonic fault line, says expert

In an interview with Atlatszo Professor Gábor Timár, head of the Department of Geophysics and Space Science at Eötvös Loránd University says that a tectonic fault line is not only close to the planned site of the Paks II plant but runs right under it.

FINA Championships got more expensive two days after closing ceremony

Even though the FINA world championships ended on Sunday, the event is still getting more and more expensive. Two contracts, together worth HUF one billion (EUR 3,3 million), were made public only this Tuesday, two days after the closing ceremony.

Max Gebhardt: Corruption Does Undermine Democracy

Transparency is the gateway to ensuring better business and government cooperation. If investors cannot clearly see Hungary’s policymaking, they have an increased risk of operation.

We also read this:

Balázs Dénes: ‘We Would Like to See That the EU Wakes Up, Democracy Will Not Protect Itself’

In an interview for the Legal Dialogue, Balázs Dénes, executive director of the Civil Liberties Union for Europe, talks about the need for a single, Europe-wide human rights watchdog. (Legal Dialogue)

Survey Says: Hungarians Aren’t Feeling Great About Their Economic Future

IRI found that 50 percent of Hungarians believe their country is headed in the wrong direction. Sixty-eight percent feel politicians don’t listen to the needs of young people. (Foreign Policy)

Is Hungary the EU’s first rogue state? Viktor Orban and the long march from freedom

A ‘long read’ tracing the path of Viktor Orban from student activist who helped free Hungary from communism to prime minister who practices “illiberal democracy.” (The New Statesman)

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